Archive | 9:53 pm

iMac rumor mill suggests new models could be coming next week

26 Apr

This one is obviously still very much in rumor territory, but a couple of separate reports have cropped up today that suggest Apple could be set to debut some updated iMacs electronic gadgets as soon as next week.

That includes a report from 9 to 5 Mac that iMac orders are being delayed until May 2nd, despite the fact that they’re still listed as shipping within 24 hours on Apple’s website, and a separate confirmation from a trusted source of the site, who says that Apple will stop shipping iMacs to retailers this week in advance of next week’s supposed release.

That’s further backed up by a report from Mac Rumors, which cites another source who says that Apple will be changing the promotional materials in its retail stores for a launch on Tuesday, May 3rd. Details are comparatively light on the rumored new iMacs electronic gadgets themselves, but the safe money seems to be on Sandy Bridge processors and Thunderbolt ports.

Source from Engadget, 9 to 5 Mac, Mac Rumors

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Dell Precision M4600 and M6600 specs emerge in leaked manual

26 Apr

Since we first peeked the new Sandy Bridge-equipped Dell Precision M4600 and M6600 tech gadgets back in February we haven’t heard much about these mobile workstations. We still don’t have prices or a release date, but a leaked manual has finally delivered some specs — and CAD enthusiasts won’t be disappointed. Both the 15.6-inch M4600 and the 17-inch M6600 can be configured with up to a Core i7 Quad Extreme 2920XM and 32GB of RAM. The smaller, 6.3-pound M4600 comes standard with a 1GB AMD FirePro M5950 and can be upgraded to an NVIDIA Quadro 2000M with 2GB. The more beastly 7.5-pound M6600 starts with a 2GB FirePro M8900 and has options ranging all the way up to a 4GB Quadro 5010M. Both tech gadgets also come packing two USB 3.0 ports, a pair of USB 2.0 connectors, an eSATA jack, and an IEEE 1394 port, giving you plenty of room to plug in all the external drives, cameras, scientific instruments, and cat-shaped mouse cozies your little heart desires.

Source from Engadget  Dell [PDF]

Samsung W200 loves swimming with the fishes

26 Apr

If scuba diving or at the very least, snorkeling is your cup of tea, then chances are you would have also invested in a good quality waterproof camera (assuming you do have the necessary shutterbug skills to go along with your other wet, wet passion, of course) – either that, or a DSLR with an expensive underwater housing. Well, Samsung intends to cater to those who are just starting out on this underwater photography thing with their latest release – the Samsung W200 electronic gadgets.

Of course, the Samsung W200 first and foremost is not a digital shooter but rather, one that captures video underwater. What you can’t do with the Samsung W200, however, would be to bring it along with you on your deep underwater forays, since anything more than 3 meters would turn it over to a candidate for the vast consumer electronics graveyard.

Of course, that does not mean it is a sissy by any means since it would be suitable to shoot great video of a relaxed day by the pool, or perhaps even up-close shots of coral reefs. The W200’s anti-water drop coating translates to the LCD display being free of condensation, even though you are in damp conditions, allowing you to continue with your amateur filming sessions without having to wipe the display.

The lens itself comes with anti-fog coating which allows steam to disperse so you always have clear, blur-free videos and pictures even if you decide to come straight after out of the pool. In order to shoot amazing underwater footage without looking too complicated, the W200 electronic gadgets will also include an Aqua Mode setting, where it will automatically set the ideal parameters for the bright and clear underwater video.

Do not look down on it just because the W200 is slim and compact – it is a tough cookie on its own, being shock-proof and dust-proof, making it more or less the perfect candidate to bring on your next backpacking adventure. Heck, surely you don’t mind letting Junior have a go at this since it is robust enough to withstand some minor knocks and drops, and with a built-in USB arm, it is even easier to share your adventure at your next stop.

The Samsung W200 electronic gadgets will be out later this May for $159 a pop.

by Coolest Gadgets

Recipe for a successful Android phone

26 Apr

A glance at the history of Android phones will reveal the immense wave of Android handsets in recent years. In just 2011 alone, at least 13 new Android phones were released in the U.S., and it’s not even May. With these many phones on the market, it’s no wonder that Android adoption is on the rise.

The problem with there being so many Android phones electronic gadgets, however, is that it’s difficult for any one phone to stand out. Consumers have a hard enough time deciding which handset to get in the first place; imagine if they are choosing between phones that are practically identical. Even for seasoned reviewers like me, the phones tend to blend together after a while.

However, there are the occasional shining stars that stand out from the crowd. The T-Mobile G2x, for example, won an Editors’ Choice Award recently because of its top-notch features and performance, and the Motorola Atrix 4G won our admiration at CES with its innovative laptop dock. We’ve learned that there are a few important components that go into a successful Android phone, and we’ve decided to share our views here.

Great design
We’re not suggesting that manufacturers cover up their phones in Swarovski crystals to get us to notice them, but a good design is nevertheless important; it shouldn’t feel like a cheap throwaway phone you bought at a drug store. The handset should have a nice solid feel in the hand; this is a sign that it’s made out of good-quality materials. Glass displays are always welcome, and a capacitive touch screen is an absolute must. The technology behind the display is important, too; we’re usually impressed with Super AMOLED screens, as well as IPS and qHD displays that provide bright and vibrant colors. Smartphones electronic gadgets are increasingly used for watching movies and playing games, so the more vivid the display, the better. We also tend to favor larger screens because of this, though anything bigger than 4.3 inches may prove to be too much.

If manufacturers decide to add additional components like a slide-out keyboard, those should be well-made, too. The keyboard shouldn’t be too flat or slippery, and the sliding mechanism should snap into place when open. While we’re not entirely sold on the idea that thinner is better, an overly bulky phone is not desirable, either. On the whole, we want a phone that looks and feels great in the hand while not weighing down our pockets.

Simplify, simplify
I’m not averse to manufacturers and carriers putting their own spin on Android with their own skins and overlays, but I really do prefer it when less is done to mess with the native Android interface. The stock Android experience is simply faster and cleaner. Some manufacturers do come up with acceptable skins that help differentiate the phones, like HTC’s Sense UI and Samsung’s less intrusive TouchWiz interface. But we’re often less than pleased with more intrusive overlays, like Motorola’s Motoblur and Sony Ericsson’s Timescape electronic gadgets. They tend to bog down the phone and clutter the screen. Of course, software upgrades arrive much earlier for native Android phones, too.

High-tech features
Even though Google doesn’t require Android phones to have the best hardware out there, we do think it’s important for manufacturers to incorporate the latest technology if they want a successful Android phone. Recently, that has meant faster processors and improved graphic chipsets, which are increasingly important for consumers who want to watch HD video or play processor-intensive games.

But it’s not just about speed; all the other features need to be improved, too. We definitely want the basics like GPS, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi, but also the ability to have a mobile Wi-Fi hot spot. The latest phones also have multimedia-friendly features like HDMI mirroring and DLNA support.

As for the camera, an 8-megapixel camera seems to be the standard for premium handsets, but the photo quality isn’t necessarily better. It would be more prudent for companies to focus on making a better sensor and improving the software. While we’re not sure video chat is something everyone will use, a front-facing camera is a nice bonus feature to have as well.

As 4G becomes more widespread, we also feel that the most successful Android phones will be able to take advantage of a 4G network, whether it be Sprint’s WiMax, Verizon’s LTE, T-Mobile’s HSPA+, or AT&T’s HSPA+ (and possible upcoming LTE network). Of course, it would be nice if the carriers offered a reliable and fast network as well.

Battery life
The biggest complaint about powerful Android smartphones like the Atrix 4G is that the battery life isn’t so great. If you can’t last a day without having to charge it, then the phone’s many features are worthless. This is especially a concern with the aforementioned dual-core phones with 4G speeds. However, this isn’t a pipe dream–we enjoyed decent battery life with the G2x, for example. Hopefully more manufacturers will find a way to marry high-tech features with better battery life.

Price
It goes without saying that the more affordable a phone is, the more successful it’ll be. A standard price tends to be around the $200 range for a premium phone that requires a two-year contract. We’ve also seen really great phones like the HTC Evo Shift 4G electronic gadgets sell for even less than that. Anything more than that tends to require a lot more justification.

Source from CNET

Leica i9 concept pairs $1,000 camera with $200 iPhone

26 Apr

When you think of manufacturers that create products to go hand-in-hand with the Apple iPhone tech gadgets, Leica probably wouldn’t come to mind.

The seemingly brilliant minds at Black Design Associates hope to change that, however. The Leica i9 concept pairs an iPhone 4 with a fixed-lens rangefinder camera, and the result is nothing short of extraordinary.

Slipping your iPhone 4 — black or white — into the back of the i9 brings the camera to life, activating the compact optical zoom, dedicated aperture and shutter dials, flash and light meter. Images are instantly viewable on the iPhone, where it’s safe to assume they’re stored as well.

The camera back doubles as a case, but you’re probably going to want to use it with a headset, unless you like talking to a camera. There’s no sign that the i9 tech gadgets will even reach the prototype phase, but nobody is going to stop the high-end camera’s designer from dreaming — especially when said dreams make us weak at the knees.

Source from Engadget

Toshiba Satellite L655-S5161Reviews

26 Apr

The good: The 15-inch Toshiba Satellite L655-S5161 is a good entry point for midsize laptops with Intel’s second-gen Core i-series processors, and we’ve always liked the company’s sleep-and-charge USB ports.

The bad: The design is strictly no-frills, and there are no high-speed data ports, such as USB 3.0 or eSATA. Plus, we hate the shortened spacebar on the keyboard.

The bottom line: Though not particularly inspiring, the basic 15-inch Toshiba Satellite L655 has a current-gen CPU and can be found for around $600, making it a worthwhile budget choice.

With numerous laptops spread across its L, C, A, M, T, E, W, and R series, Toshiba may not run out of new product lines until it runs out of letters. We’re pretty sure the midprice L series is above the entry-level C series tech gadgets, and below the premium A series, but that’s as far into Toshiba’s numerology (letterology?) as we’re willing to delve.

That said, these L-series laptops (which carry the Satellite name) have always been workhorse machines, closest perhaps to Dell’s Insprions; they typically include decent mainstream parts for $500 to $650. The latest version, called the Satellite L655-S5161, has Intel’s second-gen Core i3 processor, basic integrated graphics, 4GB of RAM, and a 500GB hard drive–about as generic a loadout as a budget-minded laptop can get.

For less than $650 (we’ve seen it for as little as $619), it’s not a door-busting bargain, and we were able to configure a comparable Dell for the same $619. But extra features, such as the sleep-and-charge USB ports (which can power phones and other devices even when the laptop is off) give it a leg up on the similarly priced competition.

Toshiba covers the L655, as most of its recent Satellites, with a dark silvery gray pattern, under one of the glossiest finishes we’ve ever seen. It could probably pick up fingerprints from someone just looking at it. Inside, the same pattern follows through to the keyboard tray and wrist rest, but the keyboard itself is jet black.

The body feels sturdy, but the trade-off is a thick, chunky laptop that isn’t going to win any modeling contracts. It’s also about a pound heavier than a 14-inch Satellite L-series laptop we looked at last year, so we wouldn’t suggest lugging it around on your daily commute (a couple of days per week is probably fine).

Flat-topped, island-style keyboards are the norm now, and Toshiba has had nearly the same one on its last several generations of Satellite laptops. The 15-inch version includes a separate number pad, with very generous number keys, as well as large Shift, Tab tech gadgets, and other useful keys. However, Toshiba has not yet fixed its main keyboard flaw: an aggravatingly shortened spacebar, which can be murder for touch typists.

The matte multitouch touch pad lies flush with the rest of the keyboard deck and can get a little lost under your fingers, but it’s well-complemented by a pair of large mouse buttons, which have a shiny surface and a convex shape for no discernible reason.

Toshiba continues to include the genuinely useful sleep-and-charge feature, which lets you use a USB port to power or recharge devices such as a mobile phone or media player, even if the laptop is asleep or off, via either the battery or AC power.

Also included are a couple of proprietary media/productivity apps. Book Place is an e-book reader/store, powered by a company called Blio (’cause it’s really hard to find places to buy e-books online). And we’ve seen Toshiba’s ReelTime before; it’s essentially a system history browser, displaying recent documents and Web pages in thumbnail form along the bottom of the screen.

The 15.6-inch display features a 1,366×768-pixel native resolution, which is standard for the size. Movies and 720p HD video look fine, although the glossy screen coating can pick up glare from nearby lights. A pair of narrow speaker grills sits right above the keyboard, but they didn’t push out much volume.

The tech gadgets of Toshiba Satellite L655’s connection options are on the bare bones side, as it doesn’t have Bluetooth, USB 3.0, or eSATA. You can’t expect too much for around $600, but we think a high-speed data port of some kind is essential these days for many users.

While this year’s Intel processors (still called the Core-i series, but the second generation of them) have shown distinct performance and battery life improvements over last year’s versions, the difference is more pronounced in the more mainstream Core i5 chips. With a lower-end 2.1GHz Intel Core i3-2310M, you’ll get a perfectly fine system for general laptop use, from multitasking to HD video playback, but other recent laptops, including Toshiba’s 13-inch Portege R835 tech gadgets, performed better. But, unless you’re doing a lot of high-end video editing, it’s unlikely to slow down or stutter under even a heavy multitasking workload.

Intel’s new integrated graphics are better than last year’s, but still not a substitute for a dedicated GPU. In Street Fighter IV, running at 1,366×768 pixels, we got 16.1 frames per second, while our older Unreal Tournament III test, at the same resolution, ran at 58.6 frames per second. That means basic gaming is possible, if you dial down settings and resolutions (and games such as World of Warcraft should play fine), but this isn’t going to be a heavy-duty gaming rig.

Source from CNET

iTamtam offers a different take on a speaker dock

26 Apr

Now this is definitely an interesting looking iPod speaker dock that some of you might actually mistake it for a chair of sorts. Known as the iTamtam, the tech gadgets will cost a rather pricey £169.99, bringing along with it a quartet of 11W titanium tweeters and a rather beefy 25W subwoofer.

This means this rather impressive looking designer speaker is no slouch when it comes to performance, fully capable of bringing the house down when the situation calls for it – of course, a packed party will not get any justice with this since you will need much more aural firepower then, but for average home use, the iTamtam shouldn’t be discounted. Heck, it doubles up as a stool when not in use as a speaker dock, so that alone earns plenty of brownie points in our books.

The iTamtam tech gadgets will come with a built-in lithium battery that is capable of lasting up to 8 hours of non-stop play when away from the nearest power outlet, and will also play nice with other tech gadgets that work with a 3.5mm connection.

by Coolest Gadgets

Dell Streak Tablet

26 Apr

Tine Dell Streak is a class apart from most tablets. Not only because of its size, but also its finish: it looks great, feels great, and is the best implementation of Android we’ve seen. That was already the case with Android 1.6, which you may find your Streak is shipped with. Check the system update screen, however, and you should find version 2.2 just a click and download away.

That’s excellent news. For a start, it brings support for Rash, helping deliver a web-browsing experience close to that of a desktop PC electronic gadgets. The 800 x 480 resolution inevitably means web pages look tight, but being able to watch embedded videos and use pinch and zoom makes it simple to skip around the full BBC site.

Dell’s update introduces its Stage interface as well. This groups together thumbnails of recent web pages so you can quickly visit favorites, and uses a similar trick for photos and music. It isn’t going to change the world, but it’s a welcome change from straightforward icons. Fortunately, Dell has retained the friendly homepage, with a Getting Started icon kept company by shortcuts for email, contacts and the Android Market among others. Calling down the list of installed applications is still as simple as pressing the downward arrow on the status bar, which is always in view. Combine that with responsive hardware controls, and the Streak becomes a very intuitive device.

The Streak can shoot video, but at 20fps and a 640 x 480 resolution, if s more of a feature tick than something we’d actually use. The 5-megapixel camera is more impressive, taking well-balanced shots in good light.

What really make the Streak more than just another tablet electronic gadgets are all the extras. Dell sells a car-kit version of the Streak for £382 exc VAT, for instance. With Google Maps coming complete with turn-by-tum navigation and looking beautifully clear on the crisp, bright Bin display, there’s a strong argument for buying this over a dedicated satnav device.

You also get unlimited texts as part of that deal, but the keyboard is one of the Streak’s weakest aspects. In portrait mode, keys are so small they’re tricky to hit. Things improve in landscape mode – especially as the Streak is the perfect size to be held in two hands and typed upon with thumbs – but we long for the Galaxy Tab’s Swype system.

Battery life is fine: the Streak still had 60% capacity left after our 24-hour test (this includes polling for email every 30 minutes, playing back audio for an hour, making a 30-minute phone call, and using the internet for an hour). That’s pretty good considering the 220g weight – and, what’s more, you can easily swap out the battery; extras cost £32 exc VAT.

This kind of flexibility is what we love about the Streak. It may sit in a no-man’s land between fully fledged tablets and smartphones, but with Android 2.2 In place Dell electronic gadgets have a winner on its hands.