Samsung BX2431 Reviews

3 May

The BX2431 is a premium-priced monitor with the looks to match. It isn’t quite as flashy as the PX2370 electronic gadgets, but the slim profile, textured rear and dainty stand all look great.

The amazingly slim figure means Samsung has resorted to an external power supply, but it’s compact enough to hide out of the way. Otherwise, there’s nothing at the rear apart from two HDMI inputs plus one D-SUB, and a 3.5mm audio out for passing HDMI audio signals to speakers or headphones. The stand is slightly wobbly, and only tilts back and forth.

More disappointing is the electronic gadgets BX2431′s panel, which is TN rather than IPS. In isolation it doesn’t look bad. There’s enough brightness thanks to the LED backlighting and subjectively there’s very little wrong with the image quality. Colors are vibrant, with only a very slight yellow tinge to whites and skin tones. It’s also very efficient, with a power draw of only 16W.

But there are weaknesses. Mild backlight leakage spills from the panel’s edges, and in dark scenes it had a tendency to crush the darkest greys into black. X-Rite’s colorimeter also showed the BX2431 to be a little offs the pace. Both gamma and colour temperature were within a whisker of ideal, but the fine average Delta E of 3.6 was undermined by a considerable peak of 9.3 in the green region.

Were the Samsung BX2431 electronic gadgets cheaper, we may have been a little more forgiving of its performance. However, when superior IPS-based monitors such as the ViewSonic VP2365wb can be bought for similar money, it’s impossible to recommend.

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Lego Audio Book Helmet can read to kids

27 Apr

Since the beginning of recorded audio, there has been books written to work in tandem with a record, cassette, CD, or digital file so that children can be read to.

This concept helmet is by Jonathan Robson, and his helmet allows a child to hear a story by plugging a Lego Brick USB stick in back on a USB slot in the back. On the Lego bricks/USB sticks are stories that go along with Lego comic books, and I believe that the child is supposed to read the comic, while the helmet electronic gadgets provide the sounds.

I’m not certain how the technology of that would work, nor what would power this (presumably batteries or some USB charging of some type). I think it is interesting that it is shaped like a helmet from a Space Lego minifig, and made so the kid is in a private world of narration.

I believe that the comic books would be available by subscription via the mail, and the info on the Lego bricks will probably be downloaded via some iTunes service of some type. However, it is still in its concept stage, but we’ll see if it ever comes to pass at the Lego catalog.

by Coolest Gadgets

Origin EON17-S gaming laptop overclocked to 4.5GHz, up for order

27 Apr

You won’t need to compromise much with Origin’s EON17-S gaming notebook, though a $3,000 dent in your wallet could severely compromise your purchasing power for the next few months. That’s the starting price for this gaming laptop electronic gadgets , with a 2.5GHz Intel Core i7-2920XM Quad-Core processor factory overclocked to 4.5GHz, and maxing the system out with 32GB of RAM, dual 480GB SSD’s, and a 2GB NVidia GeForce GTX 485M GPU will send the price tag north of $10,000.

Small price to pay for months of geek cred at your neighborhood LAN party, right? We’d rather use the money as a down payment on a Tesla Roadster, but if helping to rebuild the economy with the best, brightest and heaviest (at 8.6 pounds) computing monster sitting on your lap is just what you need, then look for yours in the mail come May 17th.

TechCrunch

Dell’s new powerhouse Precision M4600 and M6600 workstation laptops on sale May 10

27 Apr

We got a dose of details on Dell’s new Precision M4600 tech gadgets and M6600 workstations yesterday, and though impressed by their specs, we were left without answers to two very important questions: when can we get them, and how much will they cost? There must be some mind readers in Round Rock, because today Dell revealed that the machines will make their debut on May 10 with prices starting at $1,678 for the M4600 tech gadgets and $2,158 for its 17-inch big brother, though prices surely escalate quickly from there. Turns out, the laptops also have optional IPS and four-finger multi-touch displays for your viewing pleasure and RAID support for your (and your employer’s) peace of mind. That’s some stellar hardware for some serious coin, so interested parties should start brown-nosing the bossman immediately — or maybe just get a second job.

Source from Engadget

Rugged Casio G’zOne Commando official, coming to Verizon on April 28th for $200

27 Apr

We knew it was coming, and now it’s official: Casio’s macho G’zOne Commando is coming to Verizon on April 28th for a price of $200 on-contract. The Commando strays from a long line of durable dumbphones, and is the first ruggedized Android handset tech gadgets on Verizon’s network.

In addition to meeting 810G military specifications for water, dust, shock, vibration, salt fog, solar radiation, and temperature extremes, it runs Android 2.2 (Froyo) and has a 3.6-inch (480 x 800) display, 5 megapixel autofocus camera, microSD slot, WiFi, stereo Bluetooth, and a hotspot feature allowing it to share its 3G connection with up to five tech gadgets.

And, being built like a tank, it also bundles a handful of apps for outdoorsy types, including a compass, pedometer, star gazer, and thermometer. If you’ve never handled a rugged smartphone, you’ll get your chance Thursday when it hits Verizon retail stores.

Source from Engadget

iFixit Tears Apart The Nikon D5100, Warns Of “4 Billion Screws”

27 Apr

There are some electronics that are totally worth fixing yourself. Most modern electronics aren’t, though. But you still do it anyway for shits and giggles. Then there are DSLRs — or in this case, the new Nikon D5100 electronic gadgets. You’d have to be John Biggs-crazy to tear this thing apart.

Still, iFixit did just that for the good of the Internet and posted their traditional how-to guide. Before you grab your buddy’s camera to see what magic is inside, you might want to jump the last step and read notes: 2 out of 10 in the Repairability Score (the iPad 2 electronic gadgets scored a 4), there are wires that need to be desoldered, “4 billion screws”, and you need to discharge the flash capacitor. Yeah, that doesn’t sound like fun to me. It’s probably best to leave this one to the pros.

Source from CrunchGear

iMac rumor mill suggests new models could be coming next week

26 Apr

This one is obviously still very much in rumor territory, but a couple of separate reports have cropped up today that suggest Apple could be set to debut some updated iMacs electronic gadgets as soon as next week.

That includes a report from 9 to 5 Mac that iMac orders are being delayed until May 2nd, despite the fact that they’re still listed as shipping within 24 hours on Apple’s website, and a separate confirmation from a trusted source of the site, who says that Apple will stop shipping iMacs to retailers this week in advance of next week’s supposed release.

That’s further backed up by a report from Mac Rumors, which cites another source who says that Apple will be changing the promotional materials in its retail stores for a launch on Tuesday, May 3rd. Details are comparatively light on the rumored new iMacs electronic gadgets themselves, but the safe money seems to be on Sandy Bridge processors and Thunderbolt ports.

Source from Engadget, 9 to 5 Mac, Mac Rumors

Dell Precision M4600 and M6600 specs emerge in leaked manual

26 Apr

Since we first peeked the new Sandy Bridge-equipped Dell Precision M4600 and M6600 tech gadgets back in February we haven’t heard much about these mobile workstations. We still don’t have prices or a release date, but a leaked manual has finally delivered some specs — and CAD enthusiasts won’t be disappointed. Both the 15.6-inch M4600 and the 17-inch M6600 can be configured with up to a Core i7 Quad Extreme 2920XM and 32GB of RAM. The smaller, 6.3-pound M4600 comes standard with a 1GB AMD FirePro M5950 and can be upgraded to an NVIDIA Quadro 2000M with 2GB. The more beastly 7.5-pound M6600 starts with a 2GB FirePro M8900 and has options ranging all the way up to a 4GB Quadro 5010M. Both tech gadgets also come packing two USB 3.0 ports, a pair of USB 2.0 connectors, an eSATA jack, and an IEEE 1394 port, giving you plenty of room to plug in all the external drives, cameras, scientific instruments, and cat-shaped mouse cozies your little heart desires.

Source from Engadget  Dell [PDF]

Samsung W200 loves swimming with the fishes

26 Apr

If scuba diving or at the very least, snorkeling is your cup of tea, then chances are you would have also invested in a good quality waterproof camera (assuming you do have the necessary shutterbug skills to go along with your other wet, wet passion, of course) – either that, or a DSLR with an expensive underwater housing. Well, Samsung intends to cater to those who are just starting out on this underwater photography thing with their latest release – the Samsung W200 electronic gadgets.

Of course, the Samsung W200 first and foremost is not a digital shooter but rather, one that captures video underwater. What you can’t do with the Samsung W200, however, would be to bring it along with you on your deep underwater forays, since anything more than 3 meters would turn it over to a candidate for the vast consumer electronics graveyard.

Of course, that does not mean it is a sissy by any means since it would be suitable to shoot great video of a relaxed day by the pool, or perhaps even up-close shots of coral reefs. The W200’s anti-water drop coating translates to the LCD display being free of condensation, even though you are in damp conditions, allowing you to continue with your amateur filming sessions without having to wipe the display.

The lens itself comes with anti-fog coating which allows steam to disperse so you always have clear, blur-free videos and pictures even if you decide to come straight after out of the pool. In order to shoot amazing underwater footage without looking too complicated, the W200 electronic gadgets will also include an Aqua Mode setting, where it will automatically set the ideal parameters for the bright and clear underwater video.

Do not look down on it just because the W200 is slim and compact – it is a tough cookie on its own, being shock-proof and dust-proof, making it more or less the perfect candidate to bring on your next backpacking adventure. Heck, surely you don’t mind letting Junior have a go at this since it is robust enough to withstand some minor knocks and drops, and with a built-in USB arm, it is even easier to share your adventure at your next stop.

The Samsung W200 electronic gadgets will be out later this May for $159 a pop.

by Coolest Gadgets

Recipe for a successful Android phone

26 Apr

A glance at the history of Android phones will reveal the immense wave of Android handsets in recent years. In just 2011 alone, at least 13 new Android phones were released in the U.S., and it’s not even May. With these many phones on the market, it’s no wonder that Android adoption is on the rise.

The problem with there being so many Android phones electronic gadgets, however, is that it’s difficult for any one phone to stand out. Consumers have a hard enough time deciding which handset to get in the first place; imagine if they are choosing between phones that are practically identical. Even for seasoned reviewers like me, the phones tend to blend together after a while.

However, there are the occasional shining stars that stand out from the crowd. The T-Mobile G2x, for example, won an Editors’ Choice Award recently because of its top-notch features and performance, and the Motorola Atrix 4G won our admiration at CES with its innovative laptop dock. We’ve learned that there are a few important components that go into a successful Android phone, and we’ve decided to share our views here.

Great design
We’re not suggesting that manufacturers cover up their phones in Swarovski crystals to get us to notice them, but a good design is nevertheless important; it shouldn’t feel like a cheap throwaway phone you bought at a drug store. The handset should have a nice solid feel in the hand; this is a sign that it’s made out of good-quality materials. Glass displays are always welcome, and a capacitive touch screen is an absolute must. The technology behind the display is important, too; we’re usually impressed with Super AMOLED screens, as well as IPS and qHD displays that provide bright and vibrant colors. Smartphones electronic gadgets are increasingly used for watching movies and playing games, so the more vivid the display, the better. We also tend to favor larger screens because of this, though anything bigger than 4.3 inches may prove to be too much.

If manufacturers decide to add additional components like a slide-out keyboard, those should be well-made, too. The keyboard shouldn’t be too flat or slippery, and the sliding mechanism should snap into place when open. While we’re not entirely sold on the idea that thinner is better, an overly bulky phone is not desirable, either. On the whole, we want a phone that looks and feels great in the hand while not weighing down our pockets.

Simplify, simplify
I’m not averse to manufacturers and carriers putting their own spin on Android with their own skins and overlays, but I really do prefer it when less is done to mess with the native Android interface. The stock Android experience is simply faster and cleaner. Some manufacturers do come up with acceptable skins that help differentiate the phones, like HTC’s Sense UI and Samsung’s less intrusive TouchWiz interface. But we’re often less than pleased with more intrusive overlays, like Motorola’s Motoblur and Sony Ericsson’s Timescape electronic gadgets. They tend to bog down the phone and clutter the screen. Of course, software upgrades arrive much earlier for native Android phones, too.

High-tech features
Even though Google doesn’t require Android phones to have the best hardware out there, we do think it’s important for manufacturers to incorporate the latest technology if they want a successful Android phone. Recently, that has meant faster processors and improved graphic chipsets, which are increasingly important for consumers who want to watch HD video or play processor-intensive games.

But it’s not just about speed; all the other features need to be improved, too. We definitely want the basics like GPS, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi, but also the ability to have a mobile Wi-Fi hot spot. The latest phones also have multimedia-friendly features like HDMI mirroring and DLNA support.

As for the camera, an 8-megapixel camera seems to be the standard for premium handsets, but the photo quality isn’t necessarily better. It would be more prudent for companies to focus on making a better sensor and improving the software. While we’re not sure video chat is something everyone will use, a front-facing camera is a nice bonus feature to have as well.

As 4G becomes more widespread, we also feel that the most successful Android phones will be able to take advantage of a 4G network, whether it be Sprint’s WiMax, Verizon’s LTE, T-Mobile’s HSPA+, or AT&T’s HSPA+ (and possible upcoming LTE network). Of course, it would be nice if the carriers offered a reliable and fast network as well.

Battery life
The biggest complaint about powerful Android smartphones like the Atrix 4G is that the battery life isn’t so great. If you can’t last a day without having to charge it, then the phone’s many features are worthless. This is especially a concern with the aforementioned dual-core phones with 4G speeds. However, this isn’t a pipe dream–we enjoyed decent battery life with the G2x, for example. Hopefully more manufacturers will find a way to marry high-tech features with better battery life.

Price
It goes without saying that the more affordable a phone is, the more successful it’ll be. A standard price tends to be around the $200 range for a premium phone that requires a two-year contract. We’ve also seen really great phones like the HTC Evo Shift 4G electronic gadgets sell for even less than that. Anything more than that tends to require a lot more justification.

Source from CNET