Tag Archives: 3D

Panasonic AG-3DP1 shoots movies in 3D

12 Apr

Panasonic has just announced the AG-3DP1, a new camcorder designed for shooting movies in 3D. The shoulder-mounted camcorder packs a 3D twin-lens, and is designed for users planning to shoot 3D tech gadgets of live events, sports, documentaries and independent films. The AG-3DP1 packs 2 1/3″ full-HD 2.2 megapixel 3-MOS images with enhanced sensitivity, a 20-bit Digital Signal Processor for generating full production quality, native 1920 x 1080 resolution images. The camera also captures 3D footage directly through the dual-lens, without the need for any external equipment or post processing – it is possible to just shoot and cut footage from the camera to make a 3D movie. With functions like variable frame rate to create fast and slow motion effects, users can get creative with the camera itself. The lenses of these tech gadgets can zoom up to 17x and the camera records up to 80 minutes of footage on dual 64GB P2 cards in AVC-Intra 100 1080/24pN and a 3.2″ LCD display for previewing recorded footage rounds things off. No prices have been announced but we can expect to see the 3DP1 on sale in autumn this year. With 3D cameras becoming more accessible to everybody – you can expect a lot more 3D movies to start popping up in the future, especially in the indie movie scene.

Source from ubergizmo

Sony shoots out CineAlta F65 4K camera and PMW-TD300 3D camcorder at NAB

12 Apr

The current trend in the world of home theater may seem like 3D cinematography is all the hype these days, but Sony’s latest imager in its CineAlta family begs to differ. Unveiled at the 2011 NAB Show, this F65 mammoth camera electronic gadgets pack one beastly 20.4 megapixel, Super 35mm CMOS sensor — a huge leap from the F35’s 12.4 megapixel 1080p CCD. Aside from the obvious quantitative difference, what’s special about this new chip is that unlike the Bayer BG-GR subpixel matrix on conventional 4K sensors, here we have green pixels forming the 4K grid while an RB-BR matrix fills in the space, thus doubling the number of horizontal pixels to 8K for a finer 4K picture (see illustration after the break), as well as allowing better visual effects editing using the extra data. What’s more, this sensor is fast — not only can it capture up to 72fps on 4K, but these electronic gadgets can also crank up to a smooth 120fps on 2K. As for those seeking to squeeze out every bit of detail from their clips, don’t worry: the F65’s got you covered with a 16-bit RAW output (19Gbps) at 4K resolution, or it can be compressed to 5Gbps for the convenience of recording onto the new SR-R4 portable 4K recorder. Looks like Sony’s finally found a candidate that’ll put a lid on film stock, but then again, at the end of the day it’ll depend on the price tag when it comes out in Q3 this year.

Of course, Sony isn’t going to just ignore the 3D scene here. Also announced at NAB is the PMW-TD300, which will be the first professional 3D camcorder sporting a shoulder mount. Featuring a pair of Exmor 3CMOS sensors, hardcore cameramen will finally be able to go mobile with this new toy while filming 3D in 1080p. Not sure how the videos will turn out, though — we’re not keen on the idea of watching shaky and potentially nauseating 3D captured by someone running along the sideline. Anyhow, these electronic gadgets will be up for grabs in Autumn this year.

Source from Engadget

Panasonic And Partners Announce New M-3DI Active-Shutter 3D Standard

29 Mar

Because the world of 3D isn’t confusing enough already! Yes, a new standard is rising, led by Panasonic and joined by a number of partners. M-3DI is a new “can we all just agree on this” standard for active-shutter 3D systems. What differentiates it from the systems that don’t follow its standard? Nothing, it appears, except that M-3DI devices will all work with each other. I guess that’s something.

So Panasonic and Xpand 3D are the leaders, and Hitachi, Mitsubishi, ViewSonic, and several other manufacturers are joining the fun. What about Sony, Samsung, LG, and the others, you ask? Not involved. You’ll have to use their glasses tech gadgets.

Of course, the active shutter generation of 3D is going to be obsolete in a year or two once polarized or glasses-free takes over. I’m glad Panny is trying to smooth out the active-shutter landscape, but I can’t get excited when I’ve never liked the technology and know it’s on its way out.

HTC EVO 3D coming to Europe, keeping the sexy name and specs

29 Mar

Earlier this year, HTC allowed its previously Verizon-exclusive brand name out to prowl the globe with the Incredible S, and now it’s doing the same with the heretofore Sprint-only EVO moniker. The EVO 3D tech gadgets, says a tweet from HTC’s French mouthpiece, are coming to the land of baguettes, stylish mustaches and stripy pullovers, though a little bit of mystery remains as to when exactly its arrival shall be. Whatever the schedule (the EVO 3D’s set for a “summer” release in the US), the rest of Europe’s unlikely to be left out, meaning a 4.3-inch superphone with a 1.2GHz dual-core processor, 1080p video recording in 2D and 720p in 3D, HTC’s newest Sense skin and Android’s freshest Gingerbread build, is headed out to the Old Wold. And that, fellow pilgrims, is a mighty awesome thing indeed.

 

Source from Engadget

3DS Could Help With Early Diagnosis Of Vision Problems

23 Mar

One of the objections often raised against 3D, and with justice, is that people with certain common vision problems can’t see the 3D effect. It just has to do with 3D technology assuming a certain level of intact functionality in the visual system, and the fact is that a significant portion of the population, for one reason or the other, doesn’t meet that level. Our own Matt Burns can’t really see 3D. But he doesn’t let it get him down.

Then there are objections that it could affect the vision of children under 6. Fair enough — but then someone put 2 and 2 together, and thought “wait, couldn’t we use 3D to detect vision problems in the very young, and correct them before it’s too late?” Yes, it appears, we can. Yup, cool gadgets for men!

Michael Duenas, from the American Optometric Association (the glasses guys, not the eye surgery guys), calls the 3DS in particular a “godsend” because it may help to diagnose problems like amblyopia (lazy eye) before the issue has solidified into a permanent one. Before kids reach adolescence, much of their visual system (as well as other systems) is still being established, so catching these problems early is essential.

At the same time, let’s not get carried away. Jim Sheedy of Pacific University summed it up well:

“Is there a limit on how much a child should be viewing 3-D? Yeah. How much is it? I don’t know. Let’s use some sound judgment,” he said.

He noted that the No. 1 health issue associated with console and computer gaming is obesity, rather than eye problems.

“Kids should be out running around,” he said.

Source from CrunchGear

AT&T Releases First US 3D Smartphone: LG Thrill 4G

23 Mar

AT&T is really trying to up the ante this week. The company already made news on Monday with its $39 billion acquisition of T-Mobile; now it’s earning bragging rights as the first US provider to offer a 3D smartphone.

The carrier says that its LG Thrill 4G will be out in the “coming months” and will feature a dual five-megapixel camera capable of shooting both 3D photos and high-definition 720p video. Also available to LG Thrill owners is a library of 3D content in the form of photos, video clips, and games by way of the “LG 3D Space.” Other specs of these electronic gadgets include a 4.3-inch display, dual-core 1GHz processor, 16GB of flash memory, and HDMI output. Based on what we know so far, it sounds like the LG Thrill is a version of LG’s Optimus 3D, which is set to roll out in Europe sometime during the second quarter.

No word yet on how much the phone will cost, but I suspect it won’t be cheap. I’m curious to see how the 3D technology affects the phone’s battery life (a problem already plaguing the Nindendo 3DS), or if owners will be walking around with motion sickness, headaches, and blurry vision.

 

Source from Engadget