Tag Archives: apple

Apple Is Working To Fix Verizon iPad 2 Issues

11 Apr

 

Apple has responded to an issue involving a small number of iPad 2 owners who have been unable to connect to Verizon 3G tech gadgets. Apple says they are aware of the issue and are investigating it. Also, it’s said that Apple is working on getting an iOS update out in the next few days, which should fix the issue.

Sony CEO accidentally outs possible 8MP camera in iPhone 5

8 Apr

An inadvertent slip of the tongue by Sony CEO Sir Howard Stringer could confirm rumors that Apple will use the company’s 8MP camera sensor in its upcoming (but allegedly delayed) iPhone 5 electronic gadgets.

Possible details about Apple’s upcoming iPhone 5 have emerged from an unlikely source: Sony CEO Sir Howard Stringer.

While speaking with the Wall Street Journal‘s Walt Mossberg at a forum at New York City’s Carnegie Hall on Friday, Stringer made an off-handed comment that may indicate that the next-generation iPhone will come loaded with an 8MP camera — a significant boost from the iPhone 4′s 5MP camera.

The comment was made by the Sony CEO while he was talking about the one of the company’s plants Senai being damaged by the tsunami that hit Japan last month. So far, Apple has sourced mobile cameras from OmniVision electronic gadgets, which provided the 5MP camera for iPhone 4 and the 3.2MP camera for the 3GS. But if interpretations of Stringer’s comment are correct, it would indicate that Apple may start buying cameras from Sony.

“Our best sensor technology is built in one of the (tsunami) affected factories,” said Stringer (as paraphrased by 9to5Mac founder Seth Weintraub, who caught the quote). “Those go to Apple for their iPhones…or iPads. Isn’t that something? They buy our best sensors from us?”

According to Electronista, interpretations that Sony is taking over Apple’s camera production are corroborated by a rumors in February that Sony was stepping in because OmniVision couldn’t have an 8MP camera sensor ready in time for Apple’s launch date. Also, Sony’s sensor, which is currently used in its Xperia Neo handset, would meet Apple’s demands of quality over megapixel quantity with its low-light, low-noise capabilities.

As 9to5Mac points out, The Street reported in April 2010 that Apple would adopt Sony’s 8MP camera for the iPhone 5. This was included in the same report that correctly predicted a 5MP camer for the iPhone 4 electronic gadgets.

Damages to Sony’s Sendai plant — which is located in one of the areas hardest hit by the devastating earthquake and resulting tsunami — could also explain why Apple is said not to be debuting the iPhone 5 during its WWDC on June 6, which has been the release event for Apple’s latest iPhone since its release of the iPhone 3G in 2008.

 

Source from digitaltrends

The PlayBook polyglot

28 Mar


When Apple introduced the iPad, it had but a smattering of third-party applications, but the company stressed its own. As Apple iPhone software SVP Scott Forstall stated in the iPad introduction video, “We looked at the device and we decided: let’s redesign it all. Let’s redesign, reimagine and rebuild every single app from the ground up specifically for the iPad.”

Compare this to the strategy employed by RIM, makers of the upcoming BlackBerry PlayBook tablet tech gadgets. One year after the iPad’s debut, Apple’s head start in apps has proven a formidable advantage against the onslaught of slates announced by its competitors in the smartphone world. Some have chosen to latch onto Android and attain backwards compatibility with over 200,000 existing smartphone apps. HP, with its TouchPad as flagship, will circle its wagons of PCs, printers and phones around the webOS platform. However, the announcement this week that RIM, too, will support Android apps says much about how the company sees its position in the tablet wars.

C and C++ are the native routes to app development on RIM’s long-gestated tablet, but they certainly not the only ways. Flash / Adobe AIR and HTML5 will also be supported as will several popular game engines. Android and Java apps will be accommodated with add-on players and distributed via RIM’s App World, RIM’s app marketplace. The ability to run Android apps without the underlying Android operating system certainly helps bring a degree of cachet as well as functionality. At a discussion with an executive from a downmarket carrier at the CTIA Wireless show in Orlando last week, I asked what customers are asking for as they adopt smartphones tech gadgets. His response: “Android. Android is the brand. They want the apps.”

But support for Android could also have some potential downsides. With the BlackBerry OS platform generally taking a backseat to other smartphone platforms and a major platform shift to QNX in the works, Android support could serve as a sideshow that gives Android developers even less reason to natively support the platform. Android apps are also unlikely to exploit the PlayBook hardware and user interface, both of which have generated consumer excitement on their own merits. Contrast this with Apple’s attempt to optimize the iOS app experience to the point where it sought to block third-party development tools because of concern about cross-platform apps that might pander to the lowest common denominator.

Controlling the software platform may not be as vital to RIM as it is to Apple or others, but it’s still an important priority in which RIM is heavily investing. RIM’s challenge will be weaving the PlayBook’s hodgepodge of sources into a tapestry of engaging functionality. Apple may prioritize a consistently crafted experience but RIM is about delivering what works to encourage adoption and development. The key is ensuring that Android apps remain more or less an option of last resort, while the company can build the case for QNX apps that showcase and differentiate the PlayBook tech gadgets from competitors in the tablet space, and to help the company make a case for the same operating system to power future smartphones.

 

Source from Engadget

Apple To Bring AirPlay To Televisions?

24 Mar


Currently, Apple’s AirPlay can be used to stream audio from Apple devices to AirPlay-enabled devices. However, according to Bloomberg’s sources, Apple may begin licensing AirPlay for video streaming in the near future, possibly this year. This would allow streaming movies and TV shows from devices like the iPhone and iPad to larger displays.  Such an unusual move could mean that Apple is concerned about its position in the video space.

This is an interesting concept because with Apple’s massive following, AirPlay on TVs electronic gadgets could obsolete the proprietary app stores that have been popping up on new TVs (Samsung, Vizio, etc.). Not only that, but it would also mean streaming boxes like Roku, Boxee, and even the Apple TV would no longer be necessarily the best platform for streaming digital content.

Does this mean the Apple-branded HDTV rumors were false? Were those rumors actually pertaining to an Apple-licensed HDTV?!

Source from AppleInsider

Motorola Xoom vs. Apple iPad 2

24 Mar

The original iPad didn’t make it into many of CNET’s Prizefights in 2010 because, frankly, there wasn’t a whole lot of competition. But, oh, what a difference a year makes.

The Motorola Xoom was the darling of CES and Google’s first-draft pick to receive its Android 3.0 Honeycomb operating system. It was the first tablet to offer dual-core processing, and the first with Adobe Flash 10.2 support. If ever there were an iPad contender, the Xoom is it.

But the iPad is a moving target. Only a few weeks after the Xoom launched, Apple announced the iPad 2 electronic gadgets. Thinner, lighter, and more powerful than the original, the iPad 2 has proven itself a worthy successor.

Now the question is: which one should you choose? Speaking for themselves, our three CNET editors have put these two tablets through five rounds of criticism and evaluation, assigning a score to each device, round by round. In the end, only one tablet will reign victorious.

Chinon’s Avi Stylix iPod / iPhone docking station packs 7-inch LCD, streams Netflix*

23 Mar

It doesn’t scream quality (or maybe the legion of professional stock photographers were all on vacation last week), but the June-bound Avi Stylix does have something that the vast majority of me-too iPod / iPhone docking stations do not: an embedded 7-inch LCD. The usual suspects are also here, including a Dock Connector port, twin two-watt speakers, USB port, SD card slot and a bundled remote. The kicker is its ability to stream Netflix, but there’s an obvious catch; you’ll need an iPhone or iPod touch with a live internet connection in order to do so. There’s no actual WiFi module built into the main unit, so you’ll need to rely on your connected device to pull in the content. Still, for $99.99, it might not be a bad bet for your guest room. Or your office desk, since you know you aren’t getting any actual work done. Can’t wait for these tech gadgets?

Source from Engadget

Japan disaster could delay iPhone 5, disrupt PC supply chain

22 Mar

Much of the consumer electronics industry could be affected by the catastrophes in Japan within three months, experts say.

The global electronics supply chain could soon be disrupted by the ongoing disasters in Japan caused by recent earthquakes, tsunamis and nuclear catastrophes. That includes access to parts that make up PCs, as well as components of Apple electronic gadgets, like the iPad 2 and the upcoming iPhone 5, experts say.

News of such disruptions comes first via Acer Taiwan president Scott Lin, who says that, while the PC industry’s supply chain will remain intact for 2.5 to 3 months, some companies are beginning to stockpile their inventories of DRAM and LCD panels, causing short-term price inflation for those components, Digitimes reports. Lin also says that the availability of silicon wafers and adhesive used in LCD panel assembly, 90 percent of which is produced by Japan-based companies Sony and Hitachi, are already in short supply.

According to Lin, who knows first-hand how natural disaster can affect the electronics industry after experiencing the 1999 Taiwan earthquake, says that the key to resolving the supply problem is to restore Japan’s power system, which is currently in shambles due to multiple nuclear meltdowns.

As iSuppli principal analyst Michael Yang tells Computerworld, a shortage of NAND flash memory chips, which are often used in tablets and smartphones, is already underway due to production disruptions at Toshiba, which produces about 40 percent of the world’s NAND chips.

The short supply of NAND flash memory could potentially cause a delay in the release of Apple’s next-generation iPhone, which is expected to debut in June. But because of Apple’s position in the industry, the Cupertino-based company has little reason for concern.

“Apple’s purchasing power and its relationship with the [NAND] suppliers means it will get priority,” Yang tells Computerworld. “There are three other major suppliers of NAND — Samsung, Hynex and Micron — and there’s enough flex there that it shouldn’t be a huge issue for Apple.”

Other companies, including HP, Nokia and Motorola, could also be affected by an NAND shortage.

Production of the iPad 2 could also experience hang-ups, according to iSuppli analyst Wayne Lam who spoke with All Things Digital. The problem primarily centers on the iPad’s three-cell li-ion battery pack, which Lam believes is manufactured in Japan.

With disaster in Japan still taking its catastrophic toll on countless lives, the last thing on most people’s minds at the moment is how their future electronic gadgets purchases might be affected. But in this age of a global economy, it’s something everyone — from Steve Jobs to your neighborhood Best Buy register jockey — should start to consider.

 

Source from digitaltrends

Is Your 2011 MacBook Pro Freezing Up? You’re Not The Only One

22 Mar

It appears that the new MacBook Pros (introduced in February) aren’t quite fully baked. Or rather, they’re a bit overdone: there seems to be a pervasive overheating issue related to the new discrete Radeon GPUs.

The crash occurring during times of high heat and CPU load, when the GPU is switched on to handle graphics that are just too much for the CPU alone. These electronic gadgets are freezing up quite completely, and a hard reboot seems the only universal cure. One person suffering from this issue even reproduced it in every susceptible model on the floor at an Apple store, baffling (and hopefully disillusioning) one of the “geniuses.”

Apple has noted the issue and claims it is a software problem, fixable via updated drivers. Of course, they say that about everything, and of course if you severely limit use of the GPU and blast the fan at all times, technically that is a software solution. But iFixit pointed out in their teardown that the thermal situation of the processing units isn’t exactly the neatest (above), and suggested this sloppy slathering might cause issues down the road. It’s too early to tell whether that’s the case, but it’ll sure be embarrassing if it is.

 

Source from MacRumors

iPhone 5 Rumor Du Jour: Metal Backing

22 Mar

There’s so much speculation about the iPhone 5 right now, and brace yourselves — you’re bound to hear even more rumors before things get official. Case in point: today’s rumor says that the iPhone 5 will look just like the  tech gadgets of iPhone 4, except it will come with a metal backing (looking similar to this accessorized iPhone 4) and have a slightly larger four-inch screen. As you know, the glass backing on the iPhone 4 is super fragile, so using a stronger material will benefit both Apple and customers alike.

The iPhone 5 is said to be hitting production status soon, which would put it on track for a Summer release.

 

Source from geeksugar

Wi-Fi iPad 2 CAN Use Pinpoint GPS, If Tethered to iPhone

17 Mar

Side-by-side, the iPad Wi-Fi and iPad 3G don’t look different at all, but under the hood there are a lot of differences. Customers who bought a Wi-Fi model, for example, cannot use the same sophisticated GPS features that the iPad 3G has. For the electronic gadgets of iPad 2, however, there is a workaround to this.

Not advertised by Apple, an iPad 2 early adopter realized that when tethered to an iPhone via the phone’s Personal Hotspot feature, the iPad 2 was also able to leech off the iPhone’s pinpoint GPS accuracy.

“As we got closer, I decided to get some directions to make sure we were on track. I launched the iPads maps app, expecting to navigate the old fashioned way without GPS assistance — knowing full well that GPS only comes in the 3G iPad models. Imagine my surprise when my iPad pinpointed exactly where we were on the road,” wrote the iPad user who noted the feature, Kyle Carmitchel.

 

Via Cult of Mac