Tag Archives: Headphones

Beats by Dr. Dre get the ColorWare treatment, minus the color

21 Apr

Now, you’d think ColorWare would be working furiously to release some flashy iPad 2 tech gadgets, but that’s not what we’re getting today — instead we now have a pair of Monster headphones to complement that ever-so-necessary neon Dyson Air Multiplier we assume you’ve already added to every room in your tastefully decorated mansion.

These very limited edition ColorWare “Chrome Beats” headphones don’t actually have any color, but they admittedly do look pretty slick, excepting the $1,000 price tag necessitated by this perfect storm of overpriced branding. ColorWare is only decking out 50 of these ‘cans, so grab that platinum card and head over to our source link to get your pair.

Source from Engadget

Maxell’s Vibrabone HP-VBC40 earbuds can rattle your skull, if you’d like

20 Apr

Maxell has taken a slightly different approach to the bone conduction trope with its new Vibrabone HP-VBC40 earbuds electronic gadgets – headphones that combine standard stereo drivers with the same bone-rattling, vibration-based technology we’ve all come to know and love.

According to Maxell, the Vibrabone’s hybrid system enhances the bass that would be coursing its way through your cranium, while its dual volume control allows users to fine tune that bass flow.

Apparently, this bass adjustment mechanism puts less stress on your eardrums, which might make the entire bone conduction concept seem slightly less creepy. The earbuds electronic gadgets come in black, blue and white, and will be available in Japan toward the end of April, for a little under ¥4,000 or about $50.

sourceMaxell

Razer Chimaera wireless Xbox 360 headset review

2 Apr

When a product takes well over a full year to go from introduction to release, it’s natural for consumer expectations to amp themselves up a notch or two tech gadgets. Such is the case with Razer’s Chimaera, an Xbox 360-centric wireless gaming headset that was initially teased at CES 2010, and just started shipping to end users early this year. The company’s been in the gaming headset business for some time now — if you’ll recall, we thoroughly enjoyed our time with the (wired) Carcharias headset right around two years back. This 2.1 system promises to give Xbox Live yappers exactly what they’ve been waiting for, but is it really worth the $129.99 entry fee? Head on past the break for our take.

For all intents and purposes, the Chimaera is a pretty simple product. There’s a wireless base station with a 3.5mm audio input jack, a 3.5mm microphone output port, a sync button (not unlike the Wiimote situation you deal with on a daily basis) and a standby button. Upon unboxing ’em, you’ll probably spend the first ten minutes trying to figure out where a pair of rechargeable AAA batteries (included, phew!) are to be inserted. Here’s a tip: rip the panel from the earcup that lacks a microphone. You’ll thank us.

The sync process is a lot easier, and while the charging stand is hardly childproof (a simple bump will have your headset tumbling), it serves the purpose without being too unsightly. The headset itself, unfortunately, is both heavy and intimidating. And by that, we mean large. Having ample padding around the top edge and on the ear cups is certainly appreciated, but unless you have a rather sizable noggin, you’ll most likely wonder how on Earth to adjust the band down. We’ve never had any issues with the sizing on any prior headset tech gadgets, but the Chimaera essentially swallowed our head, and with no way to extend the band tighter (there’s only ten notches of extension — you know, for Goliath’s intense gaming sessions), we were left in an uncomfortable pinch.

In all seriousness, we’d recommend stopping by a retail shop and trying these on before buying — it’s hard to imagine them not being too large for a huge swath of people. In an attempt to make the most of it, we kept ’em loosely draped around our skull for a bit of gaming, and while the wireless performance was stellar, we found the 3.5mm headphone input to be (also) a bit on the large side. We tried three different cables, and all of them just felt a wee bit loose. No connection troubles were noticed, but it still managed to get under our skin. Audio quality was above-average for wireless gaming headsets, but these tech gadgets certainly won’t be your go-to cans when it comes time to sink back into a sofa and enjoy an album. The lows were definitely accentuated, likely to enhance explosions often felt in first-person shooters, and we’re guessing that everything’s equalized to best suit movies and games, not music.

The fold-down boom mic was perfectly positioned, and our chats soared through loud and clear; we couldn’t help but long for a USB connection option in order to use this as a Skype headset in a pinch, but alas, no such luck. All told, the Chimaera feels like a solid product that wasn’t exactly executed to perfection — the large, bulky design turned us off right away, and the shoddy 3.5mm input didn’t do much to rebuild that lost confidence. At $129.99, you’ve simply too many other options from the likes of Turtle Beach and SteelSeries (just to name a couple), and unless your cranium is larger than most, you’ll probably have no choice but to pass this one by.

Source from Engadget

Audio-Technica ATH-ANC23 noise-canceling earbuds now shipping

1 Apr

Audio-Technica’s ATH-ANC32 noise-canceling earbuds are now available, featuring an inline volume control and active noise cancellation circuitry.

Audio gear maker Audio-Technica is looking to step up its game in the consumer headphone arena, announcing that its new ATH-ANC23 QuietPoint active noise-canceling earbuds are now available online and via retailers. The electronic gadgets of ATH-ANC23′s feature an inline volume control that can be used with any sound source, along with active noise cancellation circuitry that generates interference to block out background noise so users can enjoy their music without blasting their heads apart. The earbuds also feature “Comply Foam Tips” in small, medium, and large sizes that sport a patented memory foam design that comfortably seals off the ear canal to make the noise-cancellation technology more effective.

The ATH-ANC23′s noise-cancellation circuitry runs off a AAA battery that’s stored inline with the volume control, so users can keep their phones or media players electronic gadgets safely tucked away in their pockets and still be able to control music volume. Audio-Technica says the noise cancellation technology can block out up to 90 percent of background sound, enabling users to focus more on their audio or other media. Audio-Technica also includes a carrying pouch and and airline adapter with the units.

The ATH-ANC23 earbuds carry a suggested retail price of $99.95, although they’ll be available from Audio-Technica directly for $79.95.

Source from digitaltrends

iSkin earTones stereo earphones with mic and remote

25 Mar

iSkin wants to spruce up your portable media player experience with their latest earTones stereo earphones that sports both an mic and remote. Coming in stylish, eye-popping colors that would make any Justin Bieber fan gush, the earTones will be able to deliver high-definition sound, lightweight comfort and flexible functionality. Thanks to its integrated microphone and remote control, earTones is able to connect to your iPhone, iPad, iPod, Mac and other supported electronic gadgets, delivering audio in/out and the ability to remotely answer and terminate calls, as well as control music and video playback. If you’re quite paranoid about picking up diseases and bacteria, then you will be well pleased to hear that the new earTones features Microban antimicrobial product protection on both the ear buds and microphone, helping inhibit the growth of fungus, odor- and stain-causing bacteria. You can choose from Black/Black, Black/Red, Black/White, Pink/Black, Blue/White and Purple/White color combinations, where any choice can be yours for $39.99.

via http://www.ubergizmo.com

Ashcraft Aria headphones for the eco-conscious audiophiles

16 Mar

Designed by Britt Ashcraft, the Aria headphones from Ashcraft Design combine the latest in audio technology with the environmentally friendly materials. While the headband is made from the wood recycled from acoustic guitars of musicians from around the world, the satin spun finished earcups have been carved from reclaimed aluminum. The leather used around the earcups and the quilted leather lining have been reclaimed from bags, jackets and other pieces of clothing. The use of leather offers a comfortable fit for the listener’s ears. The tuned 40-millimeter titanium-plated drivers guarantee high quality, clear sound for an optimum listening experience. It is a really pretty electronic gadgets for musicians!

 

Via: DesignAddict/Yanko Design