Tag Archives: lenovo

Lenovo’s LePad gets LeTeardown

3 May

Lenovo’s long awaited LePad finally made its Chinese debut back in March, and while we may not ever see the tablet stateside — not as LePad electronic gadgets, anyway — we can at least get a peak under the hood.

Thanks to a teardown by IMP3, we’re seeing the inside of the machine for the first time, and while there’s not much in the way of surprises here, it’s always nice to see what makes these things tick.

As we already knew, LePad’s packing the 1.3GHz Snapdragon chipset with Adreno 205 integrated graphics as well as an internal 27Wh battery. It’s also appears to be rocking Toshiba flash memory and a Wolfson audio processor.

So we might not have much in the way of revelations here, but at least now you know what the LePad electronic gadgets, or Skylight, or whatever, looks like underneath its skin.

 Source from Engadget

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 confirmed, faster-charging integrated battery detailed

25 Apr

Yesterday’s speculation has turned into today’s fact. The ultraslim Lenovo ThinkPad X1 electronic gadgets are most definitely real, coming soon, and just so happens to be packing some fancy new battery technology as well. This intel comes straight from Lenovo’s own servers, where a highly informative PDF (intended for reseller partners, but accessible to all) dishes the dirt on the upcoming laptop.

The X1’s “slice” battery won’t be user-replaceable, but what you lose in flexibility will be made up for in sheer performance gains, as Lenovo is touting it’ll last three times as long as a normal battery and will recharge 2.5 times faster than previous ThinkPad cells. That’s thanks to some fanciness named RapidCharge that will revitalize the X1 to 80 percent within 30 minutes.

The presentation slides show the X1 electronic gadgets right alongside Lenovo’s latest Edge models, the E420s and E220s, as part of “a new generation of ThinkPads,” and given that both of those are now shipping, the ultraslim, but still unannounced, X1 can’t be far behind. Finally, just for some added intrigue, we’ve also spotted mention of an “X Slate” within the document — any ideas as to what that might look like?

Source from Engadget

ThinkPad Edge E220s available now for $749, runs spreadsheets like the wind

21 Apr

Lenovo has been on a bit of a tear recently. Heck, it was only yesterday that the sleek and powerful X220 and X220T tech gadgets went up for sale online. Today it’s the ThinkPad Edge E220s getting some “buy now” love.

This more budget-friendly, 3.25-pound ultraportable is shipping to consumers starting at $749 with a 250GB hard drive, Intel HD 3000 graphics, a Sandy Bridge-class Core i5, and a paltry 2GB of RAM.

You can bump that to 4GB and a Core i7, but any further upgrades will have to be performed after-market. We’re sure you didn’t expect to do a ton of heavy tasks, like video editing, on a 12.5-inch screen anyway.

sourceLenovo

A 23-inch Tablet Coming From Lenovo This Year?

13 Apr

Lenovo be crazy. Or smart. Either way it seems the firm is hoping to out a 23-inch tablet by the end of 2011. This comes right from William Cai, a Lenovo senior specialist in marketing, during a talk at this year’s Gadget Show Live. I’m going with smart rather than dumb.

The man goes on to talk about the obvious challenges with the project with battery life being the biggest issue. Apparently the electronic gadgets, if it really exists, would be based off of Lenovo’s all-in-one series, which sort of lends to the idea that this will be a convertible or dockable device rather than a dedicated tablet. A 23-inch tablet would be a tough sell on its own, but there might be a market for an all-in-one computer where you can move the screen to the kitchen or living room for an hour. Actually, it’s rather surprising that HP who constantly reinvents its all-in-one touchsmart computers haven’t already done this.

Cai via TechRadar.

It’s obviously not for full mobility use, but it could be moved from room to room in the house and used with a full keyboard, or as a television.Or you could lay it on a table top and use it for family games.

We’re hoping that we can launch it later this year.

I’m sold. I doubt Lenovo would actually out the product this year with touchscreen prices still fetching high prices, but this certainly feels like the next step in the computing evolution timeline. Plus, with that much screen real estate, my issues with controlling Windows 7 electronic gadgets with a touchscreen is moot.

 

Source from CrunchGear

Lenovo ThinkPad Edge 11

12 Apr


With IT directors eking out every scrap of value from their budget in the coming months, we can expect to see a slew of cheap business laptops. Lenovo’s is an ll.6in ultraportable -albeit barely scraping into this category – that prioritizes battery life and power over sleekness.
For this is no MacBook Air 11 in. Weighing 1.53kg and measuring 31 mm at the rear, it looks and feels distinctly podgy. In fact, it’s almost the same chassis as the ThinkPad x100e tech gadgets.
The similarities stretch to the D-SUB out and power socket either side of the protruding six-cell battery, and to their battery life: the x100e gave us 6hrs 34mins of light use; the Edge 11 6hrs 32mins.
The big difference comes inside, with a low-voltage 1.33GHz Intel Core i3-380UM replacing the lackluster AMD Neo MV-40. And that transforms it. Where the x100e was essentially a netbook rival capable of only basic tasks, the Edge – with its 4GB of RAM -produced a fine 0.89 in our benchmarks.
You could just about use the Edge as a main PC, and its corporate credentials are enhanced by a Gigabit Ethernet port. Note, though, that there’s no docking station port: you’ll need to slot a USB docking station into one of the three USB 2 ports. One of those ports is powered too, so you can charge accessories even when the Edge 11 is asleep.
Lenovo includes a single 3.5mm jack, so Skype callers wishing to use the webcam should take note that their existing headsets may not work. A little incongruously, there’s an HDMI port to go with the memory card slot for SD, MMC and Memory Stick/Pro media for these tech gadgets.
There’s no discrete graphics chip, but Intel’s HD Graphics are enough to ensure 720p videos play without stuttering. They’ll look good too. The display is a cut above that of the x100e, with a glossy finish adding vibrancy to movies. Photos look superb too, and even in everyday work use it’s a pleasure to gaze at.
The keyboard feels surprisingly close to the ThinkPads of old, despite the Scrabble-tile design. Purists may not like the reduced key travel, but we reached high typing speeds without any issues: the only compromises are the Page Up and Down squeezed into the cursor key area. Consolation comes in the form of a touchpad and TrackPoint making it easier to use in confined spaces when travelling.
The Edge should survive the daily commute as well, with Lenovo’s usual high build quality evident in the sturdy chassis. There is arguably a little too much flexibility in the lid, but we’d be happy to throw this ThinkPad into a rucksack.
There’s also an AMD equivalent that uses a 1.3GHz Athlon II Neo K325, integrated Mobility Radeon 4225 graphics and 4GB of RAM. It lasted a similar 6hrs 29mins of light use, but scored 0.67. Factor in the £659 exc VAT early pricing and the fact the AMD version comes with Windows 7 Home Premium rather than Professional here, and we’d stick with Intel for now.
Of the two new Intel models, unless 3G is vital the lesser 2GB one looks a bargain. Had that been the unit on review here you’d likely be looking at an award; at close to £400 it’s an attractive budget business choice. Our sample’s appeal is diminished by rising above £500. Still, both tech gadgets deliver performance way beyond netbooks, and give IT managers a cheap, well-made business laptop that’s also a pleasure to use.

Lenovo gets serious with cubicle-approved ThinkStation E30 and ThinkCentre M81 desktops

29 Mar

They’re a far cry from being beautiful, but they’re also tremendously more powerful than that joke-of-a-machine you’re using now. In an effort to help those who live and breathe within Excel experience a life filled with fewer frustrations, Lenovo is cranking out a pair of new desktops for the working world. Both the electronic gadgets of ThinkStation E30 and ThinkCentre M81 can be outfitted with Intel’s Sandy Bridge CPUs, and the E30 can be equipped with an 80GB or 160GB SSD, NVIDIA’s Quadro / NVS graphics, up to 16GB of memory, USB 3.0 and a SATA III interface. The M81 steps down a bit with integrated Intel graphics (or a discrete ATI option), but both rigs are optimized for fast start up and shut down time under Lenovo’s Enhanced Experience (EE) 2.0 for Windows 7 program. The bad news? $629 and $599 starting points in order of mention, and you’ll have to wait until late April / early May to get your grubby paws around one. Full release is after the break, per usual.

Source from Engadget